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How do I? ...Cure & Smoke

Curing & Smoking

Italian Style Cotto Salami

This is a cooked, mildly flavored Italian salami with a characteristic flavor. It is made of coarsely chopped pork, chopped beef and pork trimmings, flavored with garlic and stuffed into large diameter casings.

Ingredients

  • 4 lbs. lean beef trimmings
  • 3 lbs. extra lean pork
  • 3 lbs. regular pork trimmings
  • (9 Tbs.) 4.8 oz. salt
  • (1 1/4 cups) 4.8 oz. non-fat dry milk
  • (5 Tbs.) 2.0 oz. sugar
  • (1 1/4 tsp.) 0.1 oz. nutmeg
  • (1 3/4 tsp.) 0.1 oz. ground cardamon
  • (3 Tbs.) 0.6 oz. cracked black pepper
  • (1 tsp.) 0.1 oz. garlic powder or 0.2 oz. fresh garlic (to taste)
  • (1 1/4 tsp.) 0.2 oz. sodium or potassium nitrate
  • (1/8 tsp.) 0.025 oz. sodium nitrite (optional)

  • (Please read about Nitrates and Nitrites)

Grind the lean beef through a 3/8-inch plate and then through a 1/4-inch plate. Grind extra lean pork and regular pork trimmings through a 1/2-inch plate and then through a 3/16-inch plate. Place all meat in the mixer, add cure and seasoning and mix well. Stuff into No. 6 fibrous casings and hang overnight in 38ºF cooler.

Remove in the morning and allow to stand at room temperature for two to three hours. Place in a 110ºF smokehouse and smoke until the desired color is obtained. The product may be finished in either of two ways:

  1. Smoked cooked salami raise temperature gradually until desired color is obtained and an internal temperature of 150ºF is reached. Shower product with cold water until internal temperature of 120º to 130ºF is reached. Allow to dry at room temperature before placing in cooler.
  2. Water-cooked product when desired color is obtained in the smokehouse, place in a vat type water cooker and process until an internal temperature of 150ºF is achieved.

The smoked cooked product is a higher quality product with better color and shelf-life due to the drier nature of the product.

NOTE: The sodium nitrite may be substituted for the sodium nitrate for more rapid cure color development and elimination of the overnight time.

CAUTION: Use only the prescribed amounts of sodium nitrite or nitrate as these are toxic at high levels.



This document was extracted from "Sausage and Smoked Meat Formulation and Processing", 1982. Bulletin 865, Cooperative Extension Service, The University of Georgia, Athens. By A. Estes Reynolds, Jr. and George A. Schuler, Extension Food Scientists.

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