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New Cranberry Recipes Add Spice to your Holiday Table

April Reese Sorrow and Elizabeth L. Andress, Ph.D.
National Center for Home Food Preservation

Don't pass on cranberries this holiday; use fresh cranberries and some innovative recipes to spice up your holiday table. The two recipes below from the National Center for Home Food Preservation at the University of Georgia take 'pass the cranberries' to a whole new level.

Elizabeth Andress, Director of the National Center for Home Food Preservation which is hosted by the College of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Georgia, said "We've created two  cranberry recipes that raise the bar on traditional cranberry-orange sauce." "Both of these can be made during cranberry season and used as delightful homemade gifts."

Cranberry Orange Chutney

Use the chutney as a side dish or spooned over turkey, chicken or pork. It also can be basted onto a ham during cooking for added flavor.

To make a canner load, you will need:

  • 24 ounces fresh whole cranberries
  • 2 cups chopped white onion
  • 2 cups golden raisins
  • 1½ cups white sugar
  • 1½ cups packed brown sugar
  • 2 cups white distilled vinegar (5 percent)
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons grated orange zest
  • 4 teaspoons peeled, grated fresh ginger
  • 3 sticks cinnamon

This recipe yields about eight half-pint jars of jellied chutney.

Start by washing half-pint canning jars; keep hot until ready to use. Prepare lids according to manufacturer's directions.

Rinse cranberries well. Combine all ingredients in a large Dutch oven. Bring to a boil over high heat; reduce heat and simmer gently for 15 minutes or until cranberries are tender. Stir often to prevent scorching. Remove cinnamon sticks and discard.

Fill the hot chutney into clean, hot half-pint jars, leaving ½-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims with a damp paper towel; apply two-piece metal canning lids. Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes (15 minutes if 1,000-6,000 ft altitude; 20 minutes if over 6,000 ft). Let cool, undisturbed, 12 to 24 hours and check seals.

You can eat the chutney fresh, too. Just refrigerate after making, putting into clean storage containers with lids. It will continue to set up over the next 24 hours but is ready to eat once it is cooled down.

Spicy Cranberry Salsa

Interested in a different cranberry taste sensation? Try a spicy cranberry salsa at your next fiesta. The Spicy Cranberry Salsa can be used directly as a dip, stirred into cream cheese just before use to make a very different spread, or used as a side item to accompany any meat.

You'll need:

  • 6 cups chopped red onion
  • 4 finely chopped large Serrano peppers
  • 1½ cups water
  • 1½ cups cider vinegar (five percent)
  • 1 tablespoon canning salt
  • 1 1/3 cups sugar
  • 6 tablespoons clover honey
  • 12 cups (2¾ pounds) rinsed, fresh whole cranberries

This recipe yields six pint jars. Gloves should be worn when handling and cutting hot peppers or wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching your face or eyes.

Begin by washing canning jars; keep hot until ready to use. Prepare lids according to manufacturer's directions.

Next, combine all ingredients, except cranberries, in a large Dutch oven. Bring to a boil over high heat; reduce heat slightly and boil gently for five minutes.

Now, add cranberries, reduce heat slightly and simmer mixture for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent scorching.

Fill the hot mixture into clean, hot pint jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Leave saucepan over low heat while filling jars. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with damp paper towel and apply two-piece metal canning lids.

Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes (15 minutes if 1,000-6,000 ft altitude; 20 minutes if over 6,000 ft). Let cool, undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours and check seals.

For more information on these recipes or for more information on any home food preservation technique and recipe visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation's Web site at: http://www.homefoodpreservation.com.


April Reese Sorrow is a former writer with the National Center for Home Food Preservation in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, The University of Georgia, Athens.

Elizabeth L. Andress is an Extension Food Safety Specialist with the Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Foods and Nutrition, College of Family and Consumer Sciences, The University of Georgia, Athens.

Reviewed and slightly revised November 2012.

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